Moving to Tuscany for a couple of years, and who knows, could become permanent. Starting as temporary resident :)

Margaret

Member
I am planing on retiring in Tuscany in 2026. I know it sounds too far down the road. For me time and prep, is a must. Outside Florence, I am interested in renting a 1 private bedroom and bathroom, utilities, wifi, gas, electricity, all tax included, if possible (air-conditioning included but not a priority). I will be using public transportation, I shop for local food items, love farmers market. I have dual citizenship European and USA. I welcome any personal experience that you might have with moving from USA to Italy (Tuscany). All your ideas will be taken in consideration. Thanks in advance. Margaret
 
Ciao Margaret and welcome to our forum! Hope we can use this platform to build up a conversation, 2026 isn't too far down the road actually, it does take planning and careful consideration to make such a move. The fact you already have EU citizenship will make all the paperwork and bureaucracy much easier, although be prepared for things to always take longer than you think they will take. I'm talking of anything and everything! :D Then you can be pleasantly surprised when they happen faster!

First, have you already been to Florence and Tuscany? If you have, do you already have any place or area in mind? I ask because Florence is expensive to live in, while towns nearby are used by a lot of commuters to come into work every day so not as cheap ad you'd think. There are a lot of connections in public transport to facilitate that in some areas but not in others. Considering you don't plan to drive, you most certainly need to put that high on the list as you select areas in which to focus your search.

Also, you say a "temporary" place - how temporary at first? Because places that might have everything included are rented as short term and cost more than places that are rented by the year but which more often than not do not include utilities or wi-fi. You can also consider that you start with a short term rental and then once you're hear look for something you love, considering you will be able to visit and see.

Ok, I think that's enough to get started. Look forward to hearing your thoughts up to now!
 
Ciao Margaret and welcome to our forum! Hope we can use this platform to build up a conversation, 2026 isn't too far down the road actually, it does take planning and careful consideration to make such a move. The fact you already have EU citizenship will make all the paperwork and bureaucracy much easier, although be prepared for things to always take longer than you think they will take. I'm talking of anything and everything! :D Then you can be pleasantly surprised when they happen faster!

First, have you already been to Florence and Tuscany? If you have, do you already have any place or area in mind? I ask because Florence is expensive to live in, while towns nearby are used by a lot of commuters to come into work every day so not as cheap ad you'd think. There are a lot of connections in public transport to facilitate that in some areas but not in others. Considering you don't plan to drive, you most certainly need to put that high on the list as you select areas in which to focus your search.

Also, you say a "temporary" place - how temporary at first? Because places that might have everything included are rented as short term and cost more than places that are rented by the year but which more often than not do not include utilities or wi-fi. You can also consider that you start with a short term rental and then once you're hear look for something you love, considering you will be able to visit and see.

Ok, I think that's enough to get started. Look forward to hearing your thoughts up to now!
Ciao Lourdes, soooo nice to hear back from you. Now I have a connection in Italy! Yes, 2026 is my year for moving forward with my life. I won't need to work in Italy. I grew up in France, I have been in California for many years. In addicting to English I speak French, Spanish and Portuguese. I am retiring, renting a small apartment or just a private furnished bedroom and bathroom on a long term rental agreement (1 year) makes sense. I have Medicare Dental and Vision in California, I am planing on purchasing a Travel Insurance for 1 year, ( just for the move) If I can renew it for another year without traveling back to USA I will do. I own my house, I will rent it during my stay in Italy. To answer your question I spent some vacation time in Florence, Venice, Rome, and Milan, but not enough to have an idea about moving in for a year. I am spending 9 nights in Florence this summer, arriving on 7/24 leaving on 8/3 to France for another 5 weeks. Renting a place for 1 year, outside Florence would be possible, I welcome your expertise. What would you recommend? I am looking forward to hear from you. Thanks for taking the time to read my email. Margaret.
 
Moving from the US to Italy is a big step, but with proper planning, it can be incredibly rewarding. When I made the move a while back, I found that researching multiple moving companies helped me get a clearer picture of the costs involved.
Hi Wortilla, Thanks for your input. My plan is to rent a 1 year furnished apartment somewhere pleasant in Tuscany, with a good public transportation system. I won't be working, no need to own a car. I will live there for 1 year, come back to USA to visit family and friends, and go back and forth as pleased. Are you a permanent resident now? I have double citizenship EU and USA. I will use my EU citizenship, to establish in Italy. Any information from you is more than welcome. I am looking forward to hearing from you.
 
Moving to Tuscany must be so exciting. As someone who's moved around a bit, I can tell you it's a great opportunity to experience new things and grow as a person. One thing I'd recommend is to immerse yourself in the local culture. Learn the language, try the local cuisine, and get to know the people. It'll make your experience so much richer and help you feel more at home. If you need any help with the move, you might want to check out https://discountmoving.ca/ . They could have some tips or services that could make the process smoother for you. Who knows, maybe Tuscany will become your new permanent home!
 
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Ciao Margaret,

Being a EU citizen will make everything much easier, as you can settle without having a need for a visa beforehand but you will still need to go through the process of getting a permit to stay "permesso di soggiorno" as an EU citizen so prepare for the bureaucracy by reading ahead what steps you'll need to take.

As far as where to base yourself: are you staying in central Florence this July? I would suggest you take some of those days and take day trips to check out Pisa, Lucca and Siena while you're here. They are major towns but still smaller towns compared to Florence which would make good bases. They tend to less costly than Florence (although staying in any historical center will not be cheap) but they will give you easy access to trains to move around while you live here.

There are definitely smaller towns along the train lines you can consider, it depends how much of a small town experience you are looking forward to living. Whereabouts do you live in California and how much of a change are you looking forward to? It might make sense to not go from city to small village at first, until you get a chance to be here and move around and see and experience how locals live. Then if you decide to stick around beyond the year, you will know where you want to go.

As for a private room with all expenses and services included, the bigger cities will offer more choices as they are used to tourism and providing those types of lodgings. But what you want is a studio apartment since you're interested in a kitchen, and most B&Bs that offer rooms will not offer kitchen access.

So I suggest you start looking at small apartments found on AirBnB, for example, to see what's available. Consider that in larger towns where people rent apartments by the week, they will be used to getting that weekly income that by the month might not be convenient so in that case the smaller towns along the train line might work better - for example, Empoli, Lastra a Signa, San Miniato are some towns between Florence and Pisa, or Montecatini or Pistoia on the line toward Lucca.

Hope I've given you some things to consider that will help as you continue your planning! I look forward to hearing back from you :).
 
Ciao Margaret,

Being a EU citizen will make everything much easier, as you can settle without having a need for a visa beforehand but you will still need to go through the process of getting a permit to stay "permesso di soggiorno" as an EU citizen so prepare for the bureaucracy by reading ahead what steps you'll need to take.

As far as where to base yourself: are you staying in central Florence this July? I would suggest you take some of those days and take day trips to check out Pisa, Lucca and Siena while you're here. They are major towns but still smaller towns compared to Florence which would make good bases. They tend to less costly than Florence (although staying in any historical center will not be cheap) but they will give you easy access to trains to move around while you live here.

There are definitely smaller towns along the train lines you can consider, it depends how much of a small town experience you are looking forward to living. Whereabouts do you live in California and how much of a change are you looking forward to? It might make sense to not go from city to small village at first, until you get a chance to be here and move around and see and experience how locals live. Then if you decide to stick around beyond the year, you will know where you want to go.

As for a private room with all expenses and services included, the bigger cities will offer more choices as they are used to tourism and providing those types of lodgings. But what you want is a studio apartment since you're interested in a kitchen, and most B&Bs that offer rooms will not offer kitchen access.

So I suggest you start looking at small apartments found on AirBnB, for example, to see what's available. Consider that in larger towns where people rent apartments by the week, they will be used to getting that weekly income that by the month might not be convenient so in that case the smaller towns along the train line might work better - for example, Empoli, Lastra a Signa, San Miniato are some towns between Florence and Pisa, or Montecatini or Pistoia on the line toward Lucca.

Hope I've given you some things to consider that will help as you continue your planning! I look forward to hearing back from you :).
Hi Lourdes
 
Hi Lourdes
Thanks you so much for the followup. I am staying at 3 different Airbnb locations. Via Maggio, Via delle Cerbine, and Via Taddeo. Total of 9 nights. I am arriving on 7/24 at Peretola Airport @ 2:30PM. What public transportations would you suggest from the Airport to my first Airbnb Via Maggio? I am excited about my soon to be adventure. As I mentioned previously, I will rent a furnished small apartment in less touristy area. I won't be working so car is not needed. My plan is to live in Tuscany 1 year, then come back to California for 6 months then go back either to the same area, or somewhere else, still in Tuscany. WE will keep in touch. I welcome any input from any one reading of my email. Thanks to all. Margaret
 
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